Summer 2009 Issue

The City Summer 2009: Full Edition

by Benjamin Domenech on August 10, 2009

The Summer 2009 issue of The City has been posted in full via Issuu, and is now available below. We hope you enjoy it.

Contents:

A Very Model of a Modern Evangelical
John Mark Reynolds + Francis J. Beckwith
Matthew Lee Anderson

Featuring
The Soul & The City + Wilfred McClay
Who Owns Science? + Hunter Baker
Solzhenitsyn & The Future + Peter Augustine Lawler
Obama & Abortion + Robert P. George
On Marriage + Jonathan Rauch & Joseph Knippenberg
Christ in the Classroom + Louis Markos

Books & Culture
Russell D. Moore on Updike’s Run
Matthew J. Milliner on Gore Walk
Jordan Ballor on The Media’s Blind Spot
Paul Bonicelli on Aid For Africa

Poetry
Lovejoy Street by A.E. Stallings

The Word
St. John Chrysostom on Faith and Politics

Solzhenitsyn On Our Future

by Benjamin Domenech on August 7, 2009

In our second article shared from the latest issue — which we assure you will soon be posted in its entirety in a more readable format — Peter Augustine Lawler‘s essay in the Summer 2009 edition of The City is a timely statement on technology and life.

The Russian novelist, historian, and essayist Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who died in August of last year, was perhaps more responsible than any other man—and certainly any other writer—for the West’s great victory in the “ideological war” with communism. It was a war, as James Schall has written, that was “about what is a human being,” during which Solzhenitsyn demonstrated his “intellectual courage, the courage to tell the truth when the regime, any regime, is built on a lie.”

The Russian was even courageous enough not to hesitate to criticize the West—including our country. In a 1993 Address to the International Academy of Philosophy in Liechtenstein entitled “We Have Ceased to See the Purpose,” Solzhenitsyn said that the defeat of communism in many ways left the West worse off. There was no longer any “unifying purpose” to mask the deepening moral vacuum characteristic of modern, progressively more technological life as such. “All we had forgotten,” Solzhenitsyn contends, “was the human soul.” The prevailing answer to “what a human being is” remains far from complete. What we have been given, he explains, is “an extremely intricate trial of our free will” brought on by our technological success.

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The Very Model of a Modern Evangelical

by John Mark Reynolds on August 2, 2009

Due to the outpouring of response to Matthew Lee Anderson’s article on the New Evangelical Scandal in last year’s Winter issue, we chose to follow this article up with responses from John Mark Reynolds of Biola and Francis Beckwith of Baylor, as well as an essay from Mr. Anderson responding to his critics. We shall be posting the entirety of our Summer 2009 issue shortly, but in the meantime, here is the text of Prof. Reynolds’ essay to tide you over.

Matthew Lee Anderson, a rising new media public intellectual, has written an article worthy of time and attention. He wishes to inform us in his recent piece “The New Evangelical Scandal” (appearing in the Winter 2008 issue of THE CITY) that the Evangelical youth are not, in fact, okay. This is a thankless task that opens up the writer, even one as bright as Anderson, to immediate scorn, especially if he is young. The tired will respond that the youth are fine, that people are always worrying about them, and that Mr. Anderson will understand all of this when he is older.

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The City Summer 2009 Issue Preview

by Benjamin Domenech on July 7, 2009

The City: Summer 2009

a very model of a modern evangelical
John Mark Reynolds + Francis J. Beckwith
Matthew Lee Anderson

featuring
The Soul & The City + Wilfred McClay
Who Owns Science? + Hunter Baker
Solzhenitsyn & The Future + Peter Augustine Lawler
Obama & Abortion + Robert P. George
A Debate on Marriage + Jonathan Rauch & Joseph Knippenberg
Christ in the Classroom + Louis Markos

books
Russell D. Moore on Updike’s Run
Matthew J. Milliner on Gore Walk
Jordan Ballor on The Media’s Blind Spot
Paul Bonicelli on Aid For Africa

with poetry by A.E. Stallings and the word spoken by St. John Chrysostom