Books by Lou Markos

Below are brief descriptions of the 5 books I have published on C. S. Lewis, Tolkien, and Apologetics and the 5 books I have published on literature. All ten books are available on my amazon.com author page at this link

(Beneath the 10 books, I’ve listed my scripts and book chapters.)

C. S. LEWIS, TOLKIEN, AND APOLOGETICS

 ON THE SHOULDERS OF HOBBITS: THE ROAD TO VIRTUE WITH TOLKIEN AND LEWIS (Moody, 2012)

This book seeks to revive a more traditional understanding of virtue and vice and of human purpose and dignity by analyzing closely J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings.  Each chapter takes up a single theme (the nature of pilgrimage, facing death, kingship and hierarchy, the virtue of hope, the love that forgives, forbidden fruit) that has been overlooked or dismissed by our age, and then illustrates and embodies that theme by reference to Tolkien’s epic fantasy.  To help clarify Tolkien’s message, each chapter also includes analysis of a parallel episode from C. S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia.

A TO Z WITH C. S. LEWIS (99 c. ebook available on Kindle/amazon 2012)

This brief ebook consists of 26 600-word essays on all aspects of C. S. Lewis (Aslan, Beauty, Courage, Desire, etc.)

APOLOGETICS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY (Crossway, 2010)

This book surveys the work of the finest popular apologists of the last century—Lewis, Chesterton, Schaeffer, McDowell, Strobel, Zacharias, and Wright among them—who have successfully demonstrated not only that Christianity “makes sense” but that it has the power to explain the nature of God, man, and the universe.

RESTORING BEAUTY: THE GOOD, THE TRUE, AND THE BEAUTIFUL IN THE WRITINGS OF C. S. LEWIS (IVP, 2010)

More and more in our modern and postmodern culture, beauty and truth have been separated both from each other and from their individual connection to a divine source of Beauty and Truth.  As both an effective apologist for truth-based education and as a sub-creator of his own beauty-enhancing fiction, C. S. Lewis is the ideal guide for all those who would seek to restore truth and beauty to their proper place and role in our world.

LEWIS AGONISTES: HOW C. S. LEWIS CAN TRAIN US TO WRESTLE WITH THE MODERN AND POSTMODERN WORLD (Broadman & Holman, 2003)

In this book, I survey the life and major fictional and non-fictional works of C. S. Lewis in such a way as to empower readers to wrestle alongside Lewis as he takes on the challenges of the modern and postmodern world.  After a mini-biography of Lewis that explores the life experiences that helped form him into the great wrestler he was, the book takes up five of the most controversial issues of our day: 1) science, 2) the New Age, 3) evil and suffering, 4) the arts and postmodernism, and 5) heaven and hell.

 

BOOKS ON LITERATURE AND LITERARY HISTORY

(NOTE: Though all five of these books take up major authors, ages, and/or themes, they are all written for lay readers who want to engage directly the great writers and ideas of the past without being bogged down by academic jargon.  All five books seek not just to study the past but to learn from it.  I have organized them so they can either be read for individual pleasure and instruction or used by teachers and homeschooling parents who would like assistance in introducing their students to the The Romantic Age, the Greek and/or Roman world, the Victorian Age, or the History of Literature in the West. Teachers and students of classical Christian schools will find them particularly helpful.)

HEAVEN AND HELL: VISIONS OF THE AFTERLIFE IN THE WESTERN POETIC TRADITION (WIPF & STOCK, 2013)

For thousands of years, philosophers, theologians, and poets have tried to pierce through the veil of death to gaze with wonder, fear, and awe on the final and eternal state of the soul. Indeed, the four great epic poets of the Western tradition (Homer, Virgil, Dante, and Milton) structured their epics in part around a descent into the underworld that is both spiritual and physical, both allegorical and geographical. This book not only considers closely these epic journeys to the “other side,” but explores the chain of influences that connects the poets to such writers as Plato, Cicero, St. John, St. Paul, Bunyan, Blake, and C. S. Lewis. Written in a narrative, “man of letters” style and complete with an annotated bibliography, a timeline, a who’s who, and an extensive glossary of Jewish, Christian, and mythological terms, this user-friendly book will help readers understand how heaven and hell have been depicted for the last 3,000 years. LITERATURE: A STUDENT’S GUIDE (Crossway, 2012)This book not only offers a guide to studying the forms, genres, and history of literature but seeks to show why literature matters in a modern technological age.  It seeks, as well, to inspire its readers to think like poets, to view the world aesthetically rather than scientifically, imaginatively rather than rationally, intuitively rather than logically.  It is part of a series of books with the general title: Reclaiming the Christian Intellectual Tradition.

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER: HOW TO SEE THE WORLD LIKE A ROMANTIC POET (Winged Lion Press, 2011)

Born out of the French Revolution and its radical faith that a nation could be shaped and altered by the dreams and visions of its people, British Romantic Poetry was founded on a belief that the objects and realities of our world, whether natural or human, are not fixed in stone but can be molded and transformed by the visionary eye of the poet. This book shall explore this key romantic notion—that things are as they are perceived, that the external world is, in part, a projection of the internal mood of the poet—as it is expressed in William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience, Wordsworth and Coleridge’s Lyrical Ballads, and such intimate crisis poems as Wordsworth’s “Intimations Ode,” Coleridge’s “Dejection: An Ode,” Shelley’s “Ode to the West Wind,” and Keats’s “Ode to a Nightingale.”


From Achilles to Christ: Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics (InterVarsity Press, 2007)

In this book, I explore how the faith and discernment of both secular and Christian readers can be strengthened and enhanced by a vigorous interaction with the central literary masterpieces of the ancient world: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, the Greek Tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and Virgil’s great Roman epic, the Aeneid. These timeless classics will be brought alive both as literary works possessing their own separate integrity within the context of the cultures and the poets that produced them and as “proto-Christian” works of almost prophetic power that point the way toward Christ and that glimmer with a faint but True Light.

Pressing Forward: Alfred, Lord Tennyson and the Victorian Age (Sapientia Press, 2007)

In this book, I offer a close reading of all the major poetry of Alfred, Lord Tennyson, together with the work of six Victorian “sages”: Matthew Arnold, T. H. Huxley, Cardinal Newman, John Stuart Mill, Thomas Carlyle, and John Ruskin.  My central thesis is that the Victorians were the first people to face directly the challenges, confusions, and upheavals of the modern world.  It is their struggles–especially their struggles with faith, science, consumerism, and progress–that are most like our own, and it is therefore their solutions that most demand our attention.

SCRIPTS

Jack and Tollers (co-writer), a screenplay about the life, work, and conversion of  C. S. Lewis, his friendship with J. R. R. Tolkien, and the events that influenced the creation of The Chronicles of Narnia and The Lord of the Rings; currently in pre-production.

Stacey’s Song (co-writer), a Church youth musical for which I wrote the script and lyrics.

The Oresteia of Aeschylus (co-adaptation), I took an adaptation of the trilogy translated literally into English and revised and edited it into poetic-idiomatic English; it was performed by a Greek acting troupe in various locations in America as well as off-Broadway, Fall of 2010.

The Iphigenia in Tauris of Euripides, adapted-edited-rendered into modern English; performed by Greek acting troupe in Theatre Row Studios (off-Broadway; 410 West 42nd St, NYC) Nov 7-Dec 4, 2011. Also performed in Houston, Dallas, Chicago, Portland, and Vancouver, Canada.

The Helen of Euripides, adapted-edited-rendered into modern English; performed by Greek troupe at LaMaMa ETC (off-Broadway; 74A East 4th St, NYC) Sept 11-23, 2012.

The Electra of Sophocles, adapted-edited-rendered into modern English; to be performed by Greek troupe in Theatre Row Studios (off-Broadway; 410 West 42nd St, NYC) Mar 3-17, 2013.

The Medea of Euripides, adapted, edited, and rendered into modern English; scheduled to be performed by Greek acting troupe in 2014.

The Oedipus & Oedipus at Colonus of Sophocles, adapted, edited, and rendered into modern English; scheduled to be performed by Greek acting troupe in 2015.

BOOK CHAPTERS

“How Boethius Built a Bridge from Ancient Pagan to Medieval Christian,” Ignatius Critical Edition of Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, Ignatius Press, 2012.

“In the Shadow of the Aeneid: Virgilian Hope and Sadness in the Life and Work of C. S. Lewis,” The Ten Books That Most Influenced C.S. Lewis, pending from InterVarsity Press, 2013.

“The Externalization of the Internal: Perception in Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience,” Ignatius Critical Edition of The Romantic Poets, Volume I, Ignatius Press, due out 2013.

“Deconstructing Deconstruction: Redeeming the Signifier in George Herbert’s ‘Redemption,’” Ignatius Critical Edition of The Metaphysical Poets, Ignatius Press, due out 2013.

“Lord Byron Learns to Laugh: The Perfecting and Exorcising of the Byronic Hero,” Ignatius Critical Edition of The Romantic Poets, Volume II Ignatius Press, due out 2013-14.

“Honeydew Ethics: The Dark Side of Romantic Inspiration,” in Literature and Ethics: From the Green Knight to the Dark Knight, Cambridge Scholars Press, 2011.

“Biography of Robert Browning,” Encyclopedia of Christian Literature,” 2 volumes, edited by George Kurian for Scarecrow Press, 2010.

“Aslan in the Public Square,” in Reasons for Faith.  Edited by Norman L. Geisler, Chad Meister, and Eric Pement for Good News Publishers/Crossway Books, 2007.

“Nobody Does it Better,” in James Bond in the 21st Century: Why we Still Need 007.  Edited by Glenn Yeffeth for BenBella, 2006.

“Redeeming Postmodernism.” in Revisiting Narnia: Fantasy, Myth and Religion in C. S. Lewis’s Chronicles.  Edited by Shanna Caughey for BenBella, 2005.